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Snorkelling in the Cape Range National Park

Turquoise Bay 

 

An excellent snorkel site easily accessible in most conditions, with a rich diversity of coral, fish and other marine life close to shore

and an exceptionally beautiful beach and bay.

Known as one of Western Australia's best beaches, Turquoise Bay is the perfect spot to spend an afternoon relaxing, swimming and snorkelling.

The white, sandy shores give way to clear waters harbouring a plethora of marine life.  Dive into the pristine waters at Turquoise Bay

to swim and snorkel within a few metres of Ningaloo Reef.

 

Exploring the reef at the snorkel drift is popular at Turquoise Bay. Enter the water at the southern end of the beach and let the current take

you over the reef for a fantastic snorkelling experience. Currents can be strong at Turquoise Bay, especially around the sandbar and at the

southernmost point of the bay, so please take care.

Inexperienced swimmers wishing to snorkel at Turquoise Bay can seek the services of licensed tour operators if they are unable to find an

experienced person to accompany them while snorkelling.

Please remember that this delightful spot is in a sanctuary zone in Ningaloo Marine Park so look but don't take.

 

 

Stay safe

Great care needs to be taken when swimming in strong currents. Strong currents are usually confined to the beach immediately west and south

of the bay and are caused by a build up of water in the lagoon in front of the reef. Large waves and high tide levels contribute to the amount of

water in the lagoon that needs to escape through the gaps in the reef. Inexperienced swimmers should not swim or snorkel in strong currents.

    Before entering the water, you should assess the current from the beach and seek advice from others with sound local knowledge. If unsure, be

cautious and simply enjoy the beach or swim well inside the bay where there is less likelihood of encountering strong currents. Park rangers do

not regularly patrol the beaches at Turquoise Bay. Watch the Safe Snorkelling video here or at the Milyering Visitor Centre before you take

to the water. You can get to this site by: Two-wheel drive and large vehicles > 7m

 

 

The Oyster Stacks

 

The Oyster Stacks are five isolated islets that protrude from the reef, which are literally covered with oysters.

The Oyster Stacks should only be snorkelled during a high tide when there is sufficient water over the reef - please check at Milyering

Visitor Centre for tide heights and times. It is recommended for more experienced snorkellers. 
Remember that Oyster Stacks is in a sanctuary zone in Ningaloo Marine Park so look but don't take.

 

 

Stay safe


  Take care of sharp oyster shells on the stacks. Avoid swimthroughs, as you could easily be cut. 
 The shore is covered with sharp and slippery rocks, broken coral and shells, so wear appropriate footwear and be aware of

any waves that may push you against the rocky shoreline.

You can get to this site by: Two-wheel drive

 

 

 

Lakeside

 

 

Lakeside is an ideal spot to explore by snorkel from the shore. There are numerous bombies of massive corals (Porites sp.) alongside

a multitude of other coral species. 

 

Lakeside’s corals shelter a profusion of marine life, with many colourful fish and invertebrates. Expect to see large rays, colourful and

energetic anemonefish and dozing sharks.


To access the snorkelling area you must walk south along the beach for 500m to reach the entry point. A guide to the trail downloadable

to your smart phone can be found at http://www.everytrail.com/guide/lakeside-snorkel-ningaloo-marine-park
Remember that the Lakeside bombies lie within a sanctuary zone within Ningaloo Marine Park. Look but don't touch.

All marine life in sanctuary zones is protected.

 

 

Stay safe

 

Lakeside can experience quite strong currents due to tidal movements and large swells breaking over the main reef crest,

one and a half kilometres offshore. These can create lagoonal currents flowing back to the sea through gaps in the reef.


Plan to swim at slack tide and be cautious of currents if the main reef has large swells breaking over it.

  Beware of fireweed, fire coral, stingrays, toadfish, stonefish and sea urchins

Lakeside was closed to camping due to flooding in April 2014 and will remain as Day Use Only site due to visitor safety concerns. The site remains a flood risk area after heavy rain or during seasonal king tides. Be mindful when leaving parked vehicles.

You can get to this site by: Two-wheel drive

All information here is courtesy of Department of Parks and Wildlife

 
 
 
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